(865) 357-7370 kim@sdp-planning.com

These warning signs, provided by the Alzheimer’s Association, are not always a sign of Alzheimer’s; they could be the sign of a disease that is treatable. If you are concerned about yourself, a friend or loved one, encourage that person to see a doctor.

1. Memory loss that disrupts daily life

Forgetting recently learned information, recent conversations, important dates or events, repeatedly asking for the same information, repeating something they just said a moment ago.

2. Difficulty planning or solving problems

Following a recipe or simple instructions, monitoring monthly bills, or easy logistics like a trip to the store with a couple of stops.

3. Difficulty completing familiar tasks

Trouble driving to a familiar (often visited) location, managing a budget at work, cooking a familiar dish with no recipe, remembering rules to a favorite game or miscues in a common activity.

4. Confusion with time or place

Losing track of dates, seasons, and the passage of time. They may at times forget where they are or how they got there.

5. Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships

People with Alzheimer’s may have trouble reading (especially long passages that require comprehension to continue,) judging distance, and determining color or contrast. Problems with driving begin to become apparent.

6. New problems with words in speaking or writing

This involves problems with following or joining conversations. People with Alzheimer’s may stop in the middle of a conversation and have no idea how to continue. They may also have trouble remembering words to identify objects (e.g., calling a “watch” a “hand-clock”) or in more extreme cases begin to display “word salad.”

7. Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps

An example is placing common items in unusual places and not remembering where they had been before losing them. Forgetting where they left the car keys MAY NOT be a cause for concern in itself.

8. Decreased or poor judgment

This includes making extravagant purchases like a new car or large gifts for acquaintances or giving large amounts of money to telemarketers. Less attention to personal hygiene also become noticeable.

9. Withdrawal from work or social activities

Some people with Alzheimer’s may begin to have trouble following their favorite sports team or remembering how to complete a project associated with a favorite hobby.

10. Changes in mood and personality

Mood changes can include confusion, depression, or the acts of being suspicious, fearful, agitated, or anxious. People with Alzheimer’s may also become easily upset at home, at work, or with friends.

*These warning signs, provided by the Alzheimer’s Association, are not always a sign of Alzheimer’s; they could be the sign of a disease that is treatable. If you are concerned about yourself, a friend, or a loved one encourage that person to see a doctor. http://www.alz.org/

Slate, Disharoon, Parrish and Associates, LLC, is located in Knoxville, Feel free to contact SDP Partner, Will Parrish with questions via email will@sdp-planning.com or directly by phone at (865) 357-7373. Visit their website, www.sdp-planning.com.

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